Give us a Call
(416) 666-9198
Business Hours
Mon - Sat: 8AM - 8PM

Encouraging Your Child’s Language

By age one

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Respond to your child’s coos, gurgles, and babbling, so they will participate
  • Talk to your child as you care for him or her throughout the day
  • Read colorful books to your child every day causing them to develop color senses
  • Tell nursery rhymes and sing songs
  • Teach your child the names of everyday items and familiar people
  • Take your child with you to new places and situations
  • Play simple games with your child such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake”

Between one and two

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Reward and encourage early efforts by saying new words
  • Talk to your baby about everything you’re doing while you’re with him
  • Speak simply, clearly, and slowly to your child while explaining relevant things
  • Talk about new places before you go, while you’re there, and when you are back home
  • Look at your child when he or she talks to you
  • Describe what your child is doing, feeling, hearing as soon as they have any problem
  • Let your child listen to children’s records and tapes
  • Praise your child’s efforts to communicate

Between two and three

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Repeat new words several times
  • Help your child listen and follow instructions by playing games: “pick up the ball,” “Touch Daddy’s s nose”
  • Take your child on trips and talk about what you see before, during and after the trip
  • Let your child tell you answers to simple questions
  • Read books every day, perhaps as part of the bedtime routine
  • Listen attentively as your child talks to you
  • Describe what you are doing, planning, thinking
  • Have the child deliver simple messages for you (Mommy needs you, Daddy )
  • Carry on conversations with the child, preferably when the two of you have some quiet time together
  • Ask questions to get your child to think and talk
  • Show the child you understand what he or she says by answering, smiling, and nodding your head
  • Expand what the; child says. If he or she says, “more juice,” you say, “Adam wants more juice.”

Between three and four

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Talk about how objects are the same or different
  • Help your child to tell stories using books and pictures
  • Let your child play with other children
  • Read longer stories to your child
  • Pay attention to your child when he’s talking
  • Talk about places you’ve been or will be going

Between four and five

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Help your child sort objects and things (ex. things you eat, animals. . )
  • Teach your child how to use the telephone
  • Let your child help you plan activities such as what you will make for Thanksgiving dinner
  • Continue talking with him about his interests
  • Read longer stories to him
  • Let her tell and make up stories for you
  • Show your pleasure when she comes to talk with you

Between five and six

Activities to encourage your child’s language

  • Praise your child when she talks about her feelings, thoughts, hopes and fears
  • Comment on what you did or how you think your child feels
  • Sing songs, rhymes with your child
  • Continue to read longer stories
  • Talk with him as you would an adult
  • Look at family photos and talk to him about your family history
  • Listen to her when she talks to you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

As COVID-19 continues to challenge us, we at SpeechLink are ready to support you with all your speech needs. We missed all our clients, and now we are ready to slowly get back to seeing you in person with new rules and regulations regarding COVID-19. We hope that we can work together to keep us all safe and to be able to provide the best quality service. 

Learn more ...