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Do You Help Your Child Develop Creativity?

CreativityGive honest answers to the questions below and check yourself, if you were able to create a favorable atmosphere for your child to develop his creative personality.

Questionnaire

  • I answer all my child’s questions in the most patient and honest way.
  • Do you take all your child’s questions and statements seriously?
  • I have a display of my child’s recent works.
  • I help my child to make plans and decisions.
  • Do you take the child to travel to interesting places?
  • I establish reasonable standards of behavior and require my child follow it.
  • Do you ever tell your child that he is worse than other children in comparison?
  • I never humiliation my child.
  • Do you replenish books and materials for his/her favorite activities?
  • I teach my children to think by themselves.
  • I read regularly to the child.
  • Encourage your child to invent stories, fantasies.
  • I find time every day to be with the child alone.
  • Do you allow the child to participate in the planning of family affairs and travel plans?
  • I never tease my child for errors.
  • I praise the child for any little achievement.
  • Do you teach the child to communicate freely with adults of all ages?
  • I always find room to praise my child in his/her studies.
  • I do not praise for no reason or insincerely.
  • Do you not rule out any topic for discussion with your child?
  • I give my children the opportunity to make their own decisions.
  • I encourage my child to the maximum independence.
  • Do you believe in the common sense of your child and fully trust him/her?

Results

  • If you can answer "yes" to all the questions and statements -- bravo! You are on the right pass to help your child develop creativity, independence, growing up goal-oriented and focused on results.
  • If not all your answered are positive – there is always room for improvement! You can always look over your relationship with your child and your attitude to him/her!

Your Stubborn Child at Different Ages

Stubborn child at different agesWhat is  a stubborn child?

Stubborn childs and stubborn teenagers are stubborn for unknown reason. Speech pathologists notices this phenomena and find solution to it.

One of the first words after mom, dad and give in the stubborn child vocabulary is "I do not want to". Immediately, parents should start paying attention to the wishes of their offspring. However, mothers and fathers are not ready to accept new trend in their stubborn child behavior. Kids always have their own reason which might be different from yours. Adults usually resits to understand that time has changed. Their quiet baby being so helpless and at their mercy now says that will never wear a hat of "girly" colors.

Stubbornness

That is why if a child’s wish doesn't coincides with parents opinion is often called stubbornness. However, stubbornness becomes very helpful.One should not forget that the ability to say NO is a very important life skill. It will be useful during school years when classmates suggest escaping from a lesson or trying drugs. So, do not discipline your child for the mere fact of disobedience. The main parents task will be to teach your stubborn child to defend their opinion in constructive ways.

How to differentiate perseverance and integrity from the desire to do everything the opposite way? Read below...

0-2 Years

Young children are just starting to explore the world. They start learning to define the boundaries of the world and their personality in it. At this age the kid just wants to take control of the situation in his/her tenacious hands. They just want to adopt his/her desires in different directions instead of following adults’ request,

  1. As soon as you feel your child is getting into this argumentative state, make a pause. Just keep silence and wait. It is possible that having received the long-awaited freedom the child makes decision you expect him/her to do.
  2. Try getting a positive answer to any question even if it's not related to the subject of the dispute. Psychologists have noted that any YES said by your opponent increases the chances of reconciliation.
  3. Do not get carried away by persuasion and explanations. At this age, emotional imaginary topic will be much more convincing. The more intriguing and truthful your story is the more effective your distraction will be.
  4. In some cases, the baby is trying to test the boundaries of what is permitted. The child may be interested in the following vital questions: "What will happen if I get up in the middle of the roadway and flatly refuse to go on the sidewalk?" Or "What will my mommy do if I take a plastic bottle cap into my mouth?"  In such cases it is better to use "administrative resources", calmly picking up the child to move across the street, or take away his inedible "delicacy." Realizing that the forces are unequal the baby stops being stubborn.

3-4 Years

Stubbornness at this age is caused not only by a desire to learn about the world, but also to actively change it by experimenting. Therefore, when the child hears "no", he/she begins silently and intently to do exactly opposite. As true scholars, they tend to confirm the theory in practice to ensure the rightness of the adult.

  1. Accompany each ban or request with detailed explanations. Try to broaden the given information from a specific case, extending it to other similar situations.
  2. Don’t give the stubborn child additional information that could push him/her to new risky experiments. For example, urging the child to stop torturing the printer buttons by endlessly pressing it doesn't explain what and how it can get broken. Just say the device needs to rest after work.
  3. Refer more often to your own experience so that your baby considers you to be a colleague in the world laboratory rather than a mentor.
  4. Reasoning with a child. Do not use phrases such as: "What did I tell you!" or "I told you so!" These phrases provoke the child to find new evidence of his rightness.
  5. If you are unable to stop your little researcher, take scientific management over the experiment. Do it together with the child to show the outcome.

5-6 Years

This period is characterized by the child’s increased attention to action motives of other people. He estimates the results of his/her findings in terms of benefits for him/herself. Not surprisingly that by selecting such a point of reference, the child gets a lot of reasons for disappointment. At this age stubbornness is a protest against selfishness of others. Ignoring or rigidly suppressing such behavior does not only help to break the resistance. It but significantly worsens the state of psychological discomfort of the stubborn child.

  • Start by asking your child what has upset him/her. Even though the child will demonstrate indifference to your question, he/she is secretly impatiently waiting to continue the conversation. Therefore keep trying to unfold the conversation and the child will join the dialogue.
  • Most preschoolers are sure that others can read their thoughts. It is possible that your child is no exception. “Why hasn’t grandmother guessed that I was about to clean up the toys myself in an hour or so, and got mad at me?” Convince the child to start by making sure people around him/her are aware of his/her thoughts and intentions.
  • While keeping the tone of your conversation friendly insist on an apology to who your child has demonstrated stubbornness. This will prevent the preschooler from the future temptation to demonstrate offence.
  • Ask your child to talk openly about what he does not like. Having trained this habit at home they can use this useful skill in communication with their peers.
  • Check your own behavior when you are upset. Don’t you get act upset and offended,  refusing to explain the reasons for your bad mood?

7-12 Years

Stubbornness of students Part 1

Stubbornness of students is often motivated by the desire to protect themselves from the numerous requirements in school and at home. Endless arguments and refusals help them postpone fulfilling the “hated” tasks.

Think whether all the requirements are clear to your child. This period is characterized by the child’s increased attention to action motives of other people. He estimates the results of his/her findings in terms of benefits for him/herself. Not surprisingly that by selecting such a point of reference, the child gets a lot of reasons for disappointment. At this age stubbornness is a protest against selfishness of others. Ignoring or rigidly suppressing such behavior does not only help to break the resistance. It but significantly worsens the state of psychological discomfort of the stubborn child.

  • Start by asking your child what has upset him/her. Even though the child will demonstrate indifference to your question, he/she is secretly impatiently waiting to continue the conversation. Therefore keep trying to unfold the conversation and the child will join the dialogue.
  • Most preschoolers are sure that others can read their thoughts. It is possible that your child is no exception. “Why hasn’t grandmother guessed that I was about to clean up the toys myself in an hour or so, and got mad at me?” Convince the child to start by making sure people around him/her are aware of his/her thoughts and intentions.
  • While keeping the tone of your conversation friendly insist on an apology to who your child has demonstrated stubbornness. This will prevent the preschooler from the future temptation to demonstrate offence.
  • Ask your child to talk openly about what he does not like. Having trained this habit at home they can use this useful skill in communication with their peers.

Stubbornness of students Part 2

  • Check your own behavior when you are upset. Don’t you get act upset and offended, refusing to explain the reasons for your bad mood.
  • Perhaps some of them seem unreasonable to him/her. Ask why in his/her opinion it is necessary to pack a backpack in the evening or wrap notebook covers. Saying the answers to these questions out loud by him/herself the child is unlikely to continue arguing on these occasions.
  • Together with the child recall the rights and privileges the child has acquired over the past few years due to his/her growing up. After establishing this list your child will approach the responsibilities with much more understanding.
  • Do not demand for an immediate compliance with your request. Remember how difficult it can be to force yourself to deal with some hard or boring matter.
  • By school age children gain critical attitude to their abilities. If a child refuses to do something consider whether or not it's related to fear of failure. In this case, reassure the child that ideal result is not expected.
  • Do not try to overcome stubbornness through intimidation. For example: "If you do not finish this task you will fail!". Or "If you do not stop being mean and moody no one will be friends with you!" A child at this age will make every effort to demonstrate indifference to these threats.
  • Try to give examples of doing something "out of spite" purposely the child is hurting him/herself.

12+ Years

Teenagers show stubbornness on a different scale: it applies not to individual actions, and affects all the spheres of life.

  • Every time arguing with a child, mentally ask yourself the question: "Do I really know what is better for him/her to do in life?" This is true about hobbies, friends, profession and other important things. Parents often try focusing on those things in their arguments. While talking to the teenagers parents always relate to their own ambitions or unrealized dreams.
  • By being stubborn the teenager protects something very important for him/herself -- their freedom, justice, independence, and so on. Do not forget, they are maximalists -- that is a person who favors direct action for achieving all their goals. They usually reject compromise! Therefore, we cannot under evaluate the teenager’s beliefs in a singler sentence, such as "You are wrong because you don't know life!"
  • Give the teenagers the right of choice. Just give them the opportunity to learn from their mistakes, as long as there is no risk to life.

10 Secret Words to Know to Better Speak With Your Children

10 words to KnowBelow are the 10 secret words to know to better speak with your children:
whisper, maybe, sorry, stop, where are your eyes, learn, you can, be present, always, and laugh

Whisper

Raising your voice is a manifestation of weakness. Moreover, children, particularly small, are responsive to the speech tone more than its content. How do you make your child obey you without elevating your voice?

It is noted time and time again that bending over to your child’s ear, having established eye contact before, and starting talking very quietly — is the most effective way to get your child’s attention. It requires parents’ high level of self-control. Surprisingly, it gives amazing results.

Maybe

Aa a rule, saying the traditional “no” straight into your child’s face can in many cases provoke stubborn resistance, especially if the child is hungry or simply tired. Alternatively, we offer “maybe” – at least it is honest. If children ask: “Are we going outside now?” I calmly say: “Maybe.” And then add: “If you clean up all the toys quickly.” In fact, this helps to motivate children to behave appropriately. Everything is simple after that – the room is cleaned up, the kids are dressed – we are going outside, not done – not going. It is important that adults themselves fulfill their own promises. You can use the words “We’ll see” and “a bit later” as effectively.

Sorry

As you know, adults make mistakes too. What to do? We are often ready to apologize to relatives, friends, our colleagues at work. Our children, however, need us to be polite to them too. This simulates your child’s respectful attitude towards others. It also helps to understand that no one is perfect in this world, which, in general, is true.

Stop

If children are running around the place, it is useless to preach, it is enough to say “Stop!” and give another direction: “Sit down at the table and do the puzzle / build a castle.” This command gives children a signal to interrupts their actions that, and tells them what to do instead. Set the rules of “Stop the game!” with your child in advance. The rule affects all without exception at any circumstances: by the sound of this command all the actions stop! The main thing – do not overuse this powerful tool, otherwise it will cease to be effective.

Where are your eyes?

More often than not, we all listen more carefully looking into the eyes of the person we talk to. When I want to make sure that the kids are really listening to me, I ask, “Where are your eyes?” You need to say it calmly, gently, with a smile, or just quietly, otherwise the children just do not want to look at you. No one would want to meet the eye of a screaming person? And as soon as the children’s eyes glued to you, you own their attention.

Learn

If your child makes a mistake, the only helpful phrase is “It’s okay, do not worry – we all learn!” Think how true it is for all of us!

You can!

Remind your children about it any time they have doubts about their abilities. Failure is just a signal to put a little more effort to achieve the desired result. Tell the children that you know that they can. And be sure to share a secret: a lot of what you yourself are doing with ease now once demanded so much effort from you.

Be Present!

Pay attention when children are asking you questions. Listen attentively when they are telling you about something. Stay with your child. It means so much to the little person! Be sincere! Be involved! Be present! The children immediately feel how engaged in a conversation we are with them.

Always!

Not surprisingly, it is always noisy and restless around the children! Tantrums happen, sweets hidden, entertainment cancelled. But some things remain untouched. Our love for our children is one of them. It is important to tell them about it. Especially on difficult days… Make is part of your daily ritual to tell your children you love them and will always love, no matter what. It is very important for your children to know and to hear t at you love them unconditionally. It’s constant! Permanent! Always!

Laugh

If we learned to laugh more at ourselves and at what surround us, lots of things were not as annoying to us as parents. A good laugh – is the best remedy.

The truth is that these 10 secret words to know are important not only for parents! Just add them to your vocabulary to be a better communicator!

Role-Play Games for Kids

Role-play games for kids

Role-play games are very popular among kids up to 12 year old. The faster you offer the games adults play the better.

If a child has come to you with a request to “play”, brought his/her favorite teddy bears or horses, even the look of which makes you sick and tired, do not get frustrated, use one of these ideas to quickly come up with a role-playing game.

Therapeutic Game

Take an issue which your child has recently faced with as a basis for your game.  For example, your child is afraid of spiders or insects. As an example, the most terrifying spider gets into trouble and is helpless and in danger, and your child with his teddy bear saves him. Well, how can you be afraid of someone you saved?

Mom’s Helper

Maybe there is something that you want to teach your baby. For example, wash your hands before meal or dressing up by him/herself. So just pretend play it.

Life Game

We just take life-based situations as a basis for the game. Maybe, you recently went to the exhibition, went for a visit,  or went to see an aquarium? What about if you walked in the woods, had a picnic? Maybe your kid went on a swing this afternoon? So play it! Invite friends to visit your child’s teddy bears, take the teddy bear to see fish that you put in a small box pretending it to be aquarium. Use your imagination! Pretend and keep up the conversation between the toys!

Preparation Game

This game will help you prepare your baby for the upcoming event. Whatever it is, a plane flight or a visit to the doctor, starting daycare or beginning school life, you can role-play it awakening the child’s interest and getting him ready for the event.

Fairy-tale or Rhyme-based Game

Very simple to implement and loved by the children idea. Just take your baby’s favorite rhyme, story or cartoon as a basis. An unbeatable success and a long-lasting game!

Occupation Games

It’s a good idea to help your child get familiar with different professions through a role-play.  As an example, your child’s teddy bear might be a veterinarian, and a favorite doll has a flower garden! Perhaps the dragon puts out fires, and the pig builds houses? Of course, do not forget to include a game about the doctor and a sport pro shop.

Journey Game

This game can be endless! You can select it on the map where to go, learn to read geographical names, plan routes, try national dishes … And all this without leaving the nursery.

School Game

Planning to teach your kid to read or count as this game can be a real success!  Make your child be a teacher while you and your child try to teach the stuffed animals to read and count the results will be unexpected!

Conclusion

No mater what you do, always try to be a part of your kids-play role while you create a bond of participation in their live.

Your baby’s speech and language skills from birth to 30 months

speech-language therapy with ChildFrom the time they are born, children start communicating. Very early in their lives, they learn to understand what you are saying and to make sounds of their own. They are beginning to develop speech and language skills. As a rule, those skills will help them to make friends and learn how to read. Furthermore, later those skills will help them to succeed at school and in life. Communication skills are critical to your child's future success.

About one in 10 children needs help developing normal speech and language skills. Without this help it's a struggle to listen and talk, it's difficult to learn to read, and it's hard to play with other children.

Developmental milestones

These developmental milestones show some of the skills that mark the progress of young children as they learn to communicate. There are also some tips on how you can help your child develop speech and language skills. If your child is not meeting one or more of these milestones, please contact your local Preschool Speech and Language Program.

By 6 months

  • turns to source of sounds
  • startles in response to sudden, loud noises
  • makes different cries for different needs - I'm hungry, I'm tired
  • watches your face as you talk
  • smiles and laughs in response to your smiles and laughs
  • imitates coughs or other sounds - ah, eh, buh

By 180 days

  • responds to his/her name
  • responds to the telephone ringing or a knock at the door
  • understands being told "no"
  • gets what he/she wants through sounds and gestures e.g., reaching to be picked up
  • plays social games with you e.g., peek-a-boo
  • enjoys being around people
  • babbles and repeats sounds - babababa, duhduhduh

By 12 months

  • follows simple one-step directions - "sit down"
  • looks across the room to something you point to
  • uses three or more words
  • uses gestures to communicate - waves "bye bye", shakes head "no"
  • gets your attention using sounds, gestures and pointing while looking at your eyes
  • brings you toys to show you
  • "performs" for attention and praise
  • combines lots of sounds as though talking - abada baduh abee
  • shows interest in simple picture books

By 1.5 year

  • understands the concepts of "in and out", "off and on"
  • points to several body parts when asked uses at least 20 words
  • responds with words or gestures to simple questions - "Where's teddy?", "What's that?"
  • demonstrates some pretend play with toys - gives teddy a drink
  • makes at least four different consonant sounds - b, n, d, g, w, h
  • enjoys being read to and looking at simple books with you
  • points to pictures using one finger

By 24 months

  • follows two-step directions - "Go find your teddy bear and show it to Grandma"
  • uses 100 or more words
  • uses at least two pronouns - "you", "me", "mine"
  • consistently combines two or more words in short phrases - "daddy hat", "truck go down"
  • enjoys being with other children
  • begins to offer toys to peers and imitates other children's actions and words
  • people can understand his/her words 50 to 60 per cent of the time
  • forms words and sounds easily and effortlessly
  • holds books the right way up and turns pages
  • "reads" to stuffed animals or toys
  • scribbles with crayons

By 2.5 years

  • understands the concepts of size (big/little) and quantity (a little, a lot, more)
  • uses some adult grammar - "two cookies", "bird flying", "I jumped"
  • more than 350 words are used
  • uses action words - run, spill, fall
  • begins taking short turns with other children, using both toys and words
  • shows concern when another child is hurt or sad
  • combines several actions in play - feeds doll then puts her to sleep; puts blocks in train then drives train and drops blocks off
  • puts sounds at the start of most words
  • produces words with two or more syllables or beats - "ba-na-na", "com-pu-ter", "a-pple"
  • recognizes familiar logos and signs - stop sign
  • remembers and understands familiar stories

Babies like it when you:

  • Get down to their level so they can see your face. This tells them that you're interested in what they're doing and saying. It makes it easier to interact with you.
  • Repeat the sounds they make. Babies enjoy making noises, and like it when you imitate them over and over.
  • Sing and laugh, especially when you are feeding, bathing, and changing them. Remember to talk to your baby throughout the day about things you do and see - "Mommy's putting on her coat", That's a big truck"
  • Tell them the names of the objects they are looking at and playing with. Babies are interested in exploring and learning about new things, and like to hear what things are called.

Toddlers like it when you:

  • Let them touch and hold books while you point to and name the pictures.
  • Use real words instead of baby talk - "give me" instead of ta ta or "bottle" instead of baba.
  • Take the time to listen to them - they want you to hear all of their new sounds, words and ideas.
  • Give them simple directions to follow - "Go find your red boots".
  • Use lots of different words when you talk to them - opposite words like up/down, in/out; action words like "running", "splashing", and descriptive words like "happy", "big", "little", "clean", "dirty".
  • Encourage them to play with other children - at the library, play groups, park.

By ServiceOntario
www.ontario.ca/children